Posted by Geoff

Geoff

A new peak of exhaustion for Clancy

News No Comment

We were now riding through the rolling grassland of cattle country, with the foothills of the Sierras slowly appearing through the haze, and beyond Mount Shasta, covered in snow even in June.

Geoff Hill and Gary Walker at Pitt River, Oregon, which Clancy crossed on a ferry
Geoff Hill and Gary Walker at Pitt River, Oregon, which Clancy crossed on a ferry

The sun was so bright that I had to check that my dark visor was actually flipped down, and my nether regions were beginning to wonder if Richard and Dr G would ever stop for a break.

At last, we pulled up outside a café in Redding for no other reason than the owner’s impressive collection of model aeroplanes hanging from the ceiling, and tucked into sandwiches the size of Belgium, but a lot more interesting.

Before long, we were riding through the foothills of the Sierras, with Mount Shasta in the distance covered in snow even in June.

Which is where it all started to go horribly wrong for Clancy and Allen.

With the mountains looming, they stopped at the express office in Redding and shipped their 50lb panniers on to Portland, bought cheap blankets in the General Merchandise store for camping, and got the owner of the harness shop to sew some canvas saddlebags for what kit they needed to get them over the mountains.

That sorted, they tanked up with more ice cream, fuel and oil, and set off late in the afternoon for the dreaded road that lay ahead.

They didn’t have long to wait: within a few miles out of Redding, they were climbing an endless succession of rocky grades with hairpin bends, then sliding down the other side to be greeted by small but lethal lakes full of boulders.

Often the road got so steep that they had to dismount and run beside the machines, and as they were sliding down one hair-raising slope with their back wheels locked, they came upon a young couple in a Cadillac stuck fast on a tree stump.

They got it free, but the hill was so steep the fuel couldn’t make it up to the carburettor, but not to be beaten, the resourceful Bob blew into the top of the fuel tank, his face slowly turning the colour of a beetroot, while the driver cranked the starter handle until the engine spluttered then fired into life and settled down into a steady rhythm.

The grateful couple gave the riders six eggs, a small can of baked beans, an even smaller can of condensed cream, a little bread, sugar and coffee, and a pail to cook it in, and since by now it was growing dark and they were still in the heart of the mountains, they found a grassy spot near a crystal stream, and while Clancy cooked up a feast in the pail, Bob made a bed of weeds and leaves between the Hendersons, they wrapped themselves in their blankets and, with strange sounds from the woods all around and lightning crackling overhead, finally fell asleep just before the grey light of dawn woke them again.

At 5am, tired and hungry, they fired up the Hendersons and set off on roads which, impossibly, were even worse than the day before.

A ferry carried them across the raging Pitt River, and halfway up the next mountain, Clancy’s Henderson ground to a halt with a dry and slipping clutch.

He greased it with oil from his tank, but the clutch was so worn and the track so steep that he could only push the Henderson up it in the fierce sun, stopping when he was so exhausted he couldn’t hold the bike upright and resting until he could try again.

It took him 20 attempts and two exhausting hours to get up that one hill, and there were a dozen more beyond.

“If ever a man was bitter against motorcycling, it was I and then,” he wept, so worn out with heat and exhaustion that he was close to flinging himself in despair onto the rocks below when a Good Samaritan with a two-horse team towed him up the last slope to find Bob, who had stormed ahead with his new 8hp machine, sitting cool and collected and full of wild strawberries.

Clancy, presumably too exhausted to strangle him, collapsed beside him and, when he had the strength to lift his head, realised for the first time the extraordinary beauty around them.

Silver waterfalls tinkled to the ravines far below, piney summits strode to the horizon, and in between, the so-called Pacific Highway threaded its way through the virgin wood.

They were further cheered by six miles of fairly good road, but it was only playing with them, for it soon returned to water, rocks, mud and hairpins, and they were exhausted as they staggered into the lumber town and summer resort of Dunsmuir.

A busy railroad hub back then, today it is a village of sleepy clapboard houses whose residents are slowly getting older and popping their clogs, and a solitary café where we tucked into ice cream on the verandah.

“Bought this place on a whim years ago,” said the owner. “Best way to get a minimum wage from maximum work.”

Geoff

Red Carpet Time – Film Premieres on May 18 at NW200

New South Wales No Comment

Roll up for your tickets to the Premiere screening of the ‘Oz – Around Australia on a Triumph’  Film at the Portrush Playhouse on May 18th, 8pm.

Yes we have produced a special edit of the documentary for the NW200 crowd and look forward to screening it at the Playhouse Cinema on Wed May 18 (8&10pm) and all day Sunday May 22 (12,2,4,6,8,10pm).  Tickets will be available on the door prior to screening and there may be drinks promos and giveaways from Coca-Cola or Relentless too. So if you are planning to visit NW200 come along and check it out.

oz_flyer_front1-212x300

All at Adelaide Adventures are pleased to announce the arrival of the DVD of the trip, HURRAH, three and a half hours of motorcycle travel adventure goodness on one dual layer dvd disc – why wait, order it now by clicking through from the link to the right of screen.

Feedback from Amazon.co.uk has been great and the first five star reviews are out –

Excellent show! Move

The launch of Geoff and Colin’s book – Oz Around Australia on a Triumph, will take place tomorrow Wednesday November 24th at Adelaide Insurance HQ in Belfast complete with barbeque and much fanfare.

There is a link below to the Blackstaff Press website where you can secure your very own copy in time for Xmas. We will post a video blog from the book launch in the next few… Continue reading

And so Geoff and Colin arrive back home to the sirens of the motorcycle police flanked by a band of bikers from the Quay Vipers Club and to the strains of Waltzing Matilda playing under the shade of the Adelaide inflatable finish line. A fitting end to a scorching adventure marked in true style by our friends from Adelaide Insurance Services. You can check out the speechifying here and stayed…Continue reading

Geoff

The Film and DVD have arrived (and about time too)

New South Wales No Comment

All at Adelaide Adventures are pleased to announce the arrival of the DVD of the trip, HURRAH, three and a half hours of motorcycle travel adventure goodness on one dual layer dvd disc – why wait, order it now by clicking through from the link to the right of screen.

Feedback from Amazon.co.uk has been great and the first five star reviews are out –

Excellent show! Move over Palin and Mcgregor!,

This is a great purchase. I like motorcycle adventure programmes and
have always fancied a trip round Oz.
There was more history and culture about the country and interviews than
I expected but presented in a really informative way and enough about
bikes to keep me entertained. In fact the whole family ended up watching
it together.

The dvd is really good value for money and I look forward to checking out the book now though I suspect I may have seen the best bits already. Makes me want to emigrate to Oz (with my bike).

M. Ewings

Red Carpet Time – Film Premieres on May 18 at NW200

Roll up for your tickets to the Premiere screening of the ‘Oz – Around Australia on a Triumph’  Film at the Portrush Playhouse on May 18th, 8pm.

Yes we have produced a special edit of the documentary for the NW200 crowd and look forward to screening it at the Playhouse Cinema on Wed May 18 (8&10pm) and all day Sunday May 22 (12,2,4,6,8,10pm).  Tickets will be available on the… Continue reading

Hot off the Press…

The launch of Geoff and Colin’s book – Oz Around Australia on a Triumph, will take place tomorrow Wednesday November 24th at Adelaide Insurance HQ in Belfast complete with barbeque and much fanfare.

There is a link below to the Blackstaff Press website where you can secure your very own copy in time for Xmas. We will post a video blog from the book launch in the next few… Continue reading

The Homecoming

And so Geoff and Colin arrive back home to the sirens of the motorcycle police flanked by a band of bikers from the Quay Vipers Club and to the strains of Waltzing Matilda playing under the shade of the Adelaide inflatable finish line. A fitting end to a scorching adventure marked in true style by our friends from Adelaide Insurance Services. You can check out the speechifying here and stayed…Continue reading

Geoff

Hot off the Press…

New South Wales No Comment

The launch of Geoff and Colin’s book – Oz Around Australia on a Triumph, will take place tomorrow Wednesday November 24th at Adelaide Insurance HQ in Belfast complete with barbeque and much fanfare.

There is a link below to the Blackstaff Press website where you can secure your very own copy in time for Xmas. We will post a video blog from the book launch in the next few days.

http://www.blackstaffpress.com/ProductInfo.aspx?product=169

Roll up for your tickets to the Premiere screening of the ‘Oz – Around Australia on a Triumph’  Film at the Portrush Playhouse on May 18th, 8pm.

Yes we have produced a special edit of the documentary for the NW200 crowd and look forward to screening it at the Playhouse Cinema on Wed May 18 (8&10pm) and all day Sunday May 22 (12,2,4,6,8,10pm).  Tickets will be available on the… Continue reading

All at Adelaide Adventures are pleased to announce the arrival of the DVD of the trip, HURRAH, three and a half hours of motorcycle travel adventure goodness on one dual layer dvd disc – why wait, order it now by clicking through from the link to the right of screen.

Feedback from Amazon.co.uk has been great and the first five star reviews are out –

Excellent show! Move

And so Geoff and Colin arrive back home to the sirens of the motorcycle police flanked by a band of bikers from the Quay Vipers Club and to the strains of Waltzing Matilda playing under the shade of the Adelaide inflatable finish line. A fitting end to a scorching adventure marked in true style by our friends from Adelaide Insurance Services. You can check out the speechifying here and stayed…Continue reading

Geoff

The Homecoming

New South Wales No Comment

And so Geoff and Colin arrive back home to the sirens of the motorcycle police flanked by a band of bikers from the Quay Vipers Club and to the strains of Waltzing Matilda playing under the shade of the Adelaide inflatable finish line. A fitting end to a scorching adventure marked in true style by our friends from Adelaide Insurance Services. You can check out the speechifying here and stayed tuned for the book and the dvd coming out later this year, because you really haven’t heard the half of what went on — sign up for more updates by entering your email address on the homepage (if you haven’t already done so) and thanks so much for following Adelaide to Adelaide — the first of the Adelaide Adventures…A big thanks to all our sponsors and to everyone who helped us along the way.

The Adelaide Adventures Team.

Roll up for your tickets to the Premiere screening of the ‘Oz — Around Australia on a Triumph’  Film at the Portrush Playhouse on May 18th, 8pm.

Yes we have produced a special edit of the documentary for the NW200 crowd and look forward to screening it at the Playhouse Cinema on Wed May 18 (8&10pm) and all day Sunday May 22 (12,2,4,6,8,10pm).  Tickets will be available on the… Continue reading

All at Adelaide Adventures are pleased to announce the arrival of the DVD of the trip, HURRAH, three and a half hours of motorcycle travel adventure goodness on one dual layer dvd disc — why wait, order it now by clicking through from the link to the right of screen.

Feedback from Amazon.co.uk has been great and the first five star reviews are out —

Excellent show! Move

The launch of Geoff and Colin’s book — Oz Around Australia on a Triumph, will take place tomorrow Wednesday November 24th at Adelaide Insurance HQ in Belfast complete with barbeque and much fanfare.

There is a link below to the Blackstaff Press website where you can secure your very own copy in time for Xmas. We will post a video blog from the book launch in the next few… Continue reading

Geoff

It’s been the strangest of adventures, but next stop, the movie!

New South Wales No Comment

helmets-1-300x225

It had, I thought that evening as we sat down in a pub in Clare to bangers and mash washed down with pints of foaming ale, been the strangest of adventures.

The previous ones, from Delhi to Belfast on an Enfield, Chicago to Los Angeles on Route 66 riding a Harley, and Chile to Alaska on a Triumph, had all involved a destination, but this time the destination had been exactly where we had started.

On the previous ones, too, I had written and filed a story and pictures every single day, whereas this time it had been a mere once a week to the Mirror and the Irish Times.

But to replace that pressure had been the pressure of filming, blogging, juggling a diminishing budget and dealing with the logistics and management of a larger team than before, including all the personality problems that involved. Like when we all had to sit down and have a good talk about staying positive.

Or when Paul the cameraman had arrived for the second half of the trip and found it almost impossible to cope with the demands of filming and driving all day in intense heat and humidity, yet gone on to overcome them in admirable fashion.

Or, indeed, coping with my own problems from being so far away from home for so long, struggling to keep my temper and patience at times, and struggling even harder with the daily battle we all face, that act of will to keep hope one step ahead of despair.

At lunchtime the next day, we finally rolled past the Adelaide city limits, and parked in exactly the same spot outside the same apartments we had left from.

There was even the same girl on reception, to add to the surreal sense that it had all been a dream.

Except for the fact that all afternoon I wandered around with my mouth open at sights I had not seen for the past three months.

Delicatessens! Day spas! Fashion shops! People wearing suits! Restaurants! And not just restaurants, but Thai, Mexican, Indian, Tibetan, Kashmiri and Nepalese ones.

Geoff

Iron Knob steels us for the end of the road

South Australia No Comment

At a place called Kimba in South Australia, we halted to take a picture of a giant galah, but then we managed to get Geoff out of shot so we could get a photo of the big parrot.
Our next break was at Iron Knob, as we just couldn’t resist.
It is the birthplace of the Aussie steel industry, as the knob itself was almost pure iron ore.
As mature adventurers, we felt beholden to crack some puerile knob jokes, many featuring rust, before decamping for a last blast to Port Augusta.
This was meant to be our last night in the bush, for tomorrow, it was Adelaide and the end of our long run.
As it turned out we had one more final night out in the country, as with the chaos caused by the Icelandic volcano eruption, we hadn’t yet heard from our airline and so had no date to fly.
Rather than rush into Adelaide we detoured to the Clare Valley, a famous wine growing region.
The explorer Horrocks is buried there and as Geoff was tickled by his tale, we stopped at his grave and monument so he could pay tribute.
Clare town is right next to the Armagh valley settlement, so we felt right at home, and it seemed fitting that we spent our last day roaming around familiar place names.
Spotting an Irish tricolour flying at a small country pub, we decided to investigate and learned that the Irish had come here in force over the past 200 years, and become heavily involved in the wine business. The barman displayed one bottle from the vineyard of a local maker called James Barry.
‘$270’ he said casually.
‘What $2.70? said Hill, still reeling from his experience at the Voyager winery in WA.
‘No, $270, though you can get some for around $190.’
Geoff picked himself up off the floor and acted like a carpenter, that is, he made a bolt for the door.
I put the bottle down very carefully and, as they say in the journalism trade, made our excuses and left.
The next day, we were suddenly in Adelaide.
It was something of a culture shock, as one minute we were sailing through rolling sheep and wheat country and the next caught up in heavy traffic heading into the city on a three-lane freeway.
The Adelaide Adventure was over. We pulled in elated, but at the same time deflated and with those mixed feelings chewing around inside us, congratulated each other on making it all the way around.

Geoff

The tragic tale of Harry the psychotic camel

New South Wales No Comment

dsc00441-225x300At Nundroo, after the featureless plains of the Nullarbor, came the first signs of civilisation: wheat fields, little windmills pumping water from the soaks below, then farms and houses. Well, only one, to be honest, but you have to start somewhere.

Suddenly, late in the golden afternoon, we crested a rise to be smacked in the face by a cool sea breeze, and 20 minutes later had descended to the coast at Ceduna, the first town we had seen in the five days it had taken us to cross the Nullarbor.

Edward John Eyre, the first man to cross this desolate plain in 1840 and 1841 from east to west, had taken five months in a trek which saw the deaths of three of his party and left Eyre and his native tracker Wylie cresting a similar rise at the other side of the Nullarbor to see the little settlement of Albany, where they had long been given up for dead.

As they stood looking down at the houses of the town in howling wind and rain, Eyre wept as he looked back on the horrendous crossing, and wrote later in his diary: “The contrast between the circumstances under which I had commenced and terminated my labours stood in strong relief before me.

“The gay and gallant cavalcade that accompanied me on my way at starting, the goodly array of horses and drays, with all their well-ordered appointments and equipment, were conjured up in all their circumstances of pride and pleasure; and I could not restrain a tear as I called to mind the…sad disasters that had broken up my party, and left myself and Wylie the two sole wanderers remaining at the close of an undertaking entered upon under such hopeful auspices.”

Compared to Eyre, and even Winifred, our troubles had been paltry, but he was not the explorer I wanted to pay homage to before we arrived in Adelaide.

No, that was John Ainswsorth Horrocks, whose grave lies in Penwortham, a smattering of houses huddled around a church for comfort..

On the way there is Wirrulla, which was preceded for miles by signs saying Wirrulla: The Town With a Secret.

“Here, what’s Wirrulla’s secret?” I said to a large and cheery woman emerging from the grocery store with a melon and a leg of pig.

“If I told you, it wouldn’t be a secret, would it?” she grinned, getting into a dusty white ute and driving off.

The next morning, after a night at the venerable Flinders Hotel in Port Agusta, we rode south, frozen solid by the rain and wind of the approaching winter.

On our left rose the sullen lump of Mount Remarkable, presumably named with the same sense of irony with which redheads in Australia are invariably called Blue. Alongside the road, meanwhile, ran a pipeline which I naturally assumed was transporting pies from the great pie mines of central Australia, but which sadly turned out to contain only gas.

On the stroke of noon, we dismounted in Penwortham, walked up a grassy path past the little church, and found ourselves standing before the grave of Horrocks, who set forth from these parts in July 1846 to find good pastoral land.

From the very start, his expedition was prescient proof of W C Fields’ later adage that you should never work with children or animals.

Particularly animals: first the goats took great delight in leaping on the tent and eating it. Then Harry, a psychotic camel who was the first of his species to be used on an Australian expedition, tried to eat one of the goats, bit Garlick the tent-keeper, who was presumably wandering around redundant since he had no tent to keep, and chewed to bits the precious bags of flour.

As if that wasn’t enough, one evening as Horrocks was dismounting, Harry lurched to one side and discharged Horrocks’ gun, which was rather unfortunately pointing at Horrocks at the time.

Harry was subsequently shot, although it took two bullets to kill him and he bit a stockman on the head before succumbing, Horrocks died of his wounds two weeks later, and 164 years later, we stood in mute homage before the plain grey cross and matching slab which marks the last resting place of the only explorer in history to be shot by his own camel.

I had half hoped that alongside it would be a grassy hump marking the spot where Harry had been buried standing up next to his arch enemy, bit it was not to be, so we got back on the bikes and rode the few miles into Clare, a pleasant little town where the contrasts of Australia yet again surprised me.

Half an hour north of here, we had been riding through endless grassy plains with no sign of life in any direction, and yet here we were ensconced in a little pub, with rooms upstairs, a roaring fire against the late autumn chill, and a bottle of Black Bush beckoning from behind the bar.

Truly, this country is a land of wilderness interrupted by tiny outposts of civilisation, and after so much of the former, today we were most glad of the latter.

Geoff

Mighty Nullarbor has been tamed

Western Australia No Comment

The longest stretch of straight road in the world finishes at a roadhouse at a place called Caiguna where the locals seemed friendly and there was an extensive menu on offer 24 hours a day.
We decided to call it quits there and took a room at the adjoining hotel.
After Geoff finally managed to get the right key – and discovered he’d accidentally purloined the key to his room in Norseman, we settled into our room.
It is the second key Geoff has managed to nick so far, leading us to suspect he may be a closet – or front door – kleptomaniac.
There was not much to do but work, but the footy was on the telly, we had beer and hamburgers, so survival was assured.
It turned out the footy wasn’t on – curses, but the burgers were good, so we settled for watching From Russia With Love, or at least half of it before we all passed out.
Apparently then I took Geoff on in a snoring competition, driving Paul to distraction and forcing him to abandon his bed in the middle of the night for the quiet of Matilda, so we don’t know who came out on top as there was no independent judge.
Next morning we had a chat with a young biker on a Kawasaki Ninja who had stayed with his mate a couple of doors down.
They lived just down the road at Cocklebiddy, and came up for the night to drink beer and see their girlfriends who worked at the roadhouse.
They were having beer for breakfast, before they headed off down the road, the mate driving and his pal screaming off on the Ninja wearing just jeans, trainers and a singlet, making my skin creep at the thought of what would happen if he fell off.
We passed them a while later in a layby, having yet another beer, as it seems the drink-driving stigma hasn’t permeated this far into the desert as yet.
Then they roared past us, the bike doing around 200kms with the mate in the car just behind going a lttle slower. We passed them once more standing on the side of a dam, beers in hand, waving. Guess that’s what counts as a big weekend out in Cocklebiddy.
We stopped there to fuel up, and headed on once more.
Along the road I noticed a strange phenomenon – various articles of attire hanging from dead trees.
One was covered in hats, another in what were once t-shirts but were now rags, yet another in what appeared to be women’s underwear. Yet another mystery of the Nullarbor.
As we were once more on unfenced roads, we passed signs warning of camels, cattle, ‘roos and emus, but nary a one appeared, which was a bit disappointing as we would have quite liked to see some camels.
Australia now has more wild camels than anywhere else in the world, the descendants of those released or which escaped from explorers and camel drivers working on the railroad and telegraph. Some are now sold back to the Middle East for racing as the ones here are thought to be the best quality in the world, having been toughened by years in the bush and virtually disease free.
All of a sudden we came upon the Madura Pass, where the flat plain suddenly drops away towards the Great Australian Bight, offering an astounding view of the plain from above. It looks like the Serengeti, minus the herds of wildebeest.
At Madura roadhouse a Toyota people carrier stood abandoned, its front end destroyed after hitting a kangaroo, showing just how much damage the animals can do if you hit one.
We had our usual pie for lunch, $4.20 and quite tasty, followed by a totally surreal and slightly worrying argument over who sang a certain ‘80s power ballad playing over the PA, which we then dragged the locals into.
Leaving with our manly biker credentials in tatters, we roared off, trying to recoup some street cred.
Our stop for tonight was Eucla, where the east-west telegraph was joined back in 1877.
Eucla was once closer to the coast but the town was abandoned and built four kilometres further inland after the coastal sand dunes buried it. Only the old telegraph station emerges periodically from the sand, standing forlornly in the dunes with only the wild camels and passing tourists for company.
So far, I was a little disappointed in the Nullarbor, as it was nothing like it had been when I last passed through here. Back then it was nothing but arid desert, hardly a bush or tree, looking like the surface of Mars, with rocks the only thing to look at. After all the recent rain it was now green, and trees, though small, were plentiful.
While it certainly made for an easier trip with more to look at, I couldn’t help feeling a little cheated that the mighty Nullarbor we had been almost dreading was proving to be a bit of a doddle. There are also many more roadhouses and fuel stops than there used to be, lessening the sense of challenge and conquest. Still, all things must change and it seems even the desert can be tamed

Geoff

As golfers go, we make great bikers

New South Wales No Comment

dscf1251-300x225The Nullarbor Desert creeps up on you.

From Albany through Esperance and on to Norseman, the landscape changes from forest and vine to woodland and scrub, then to wheat fields so vast that after five of them I stopped saying: “Wow, that would make a good spot for a flying club”.

They are punctuated from time to time by farm entrances invariably marked by a pair of white tractor tyres or wagon wheels buried in the earth, below a sign saying Green Acres: Bob and Gayle Hunnicutt and Sons, or somesuch, and from time to time also by circular salt flats glittering in the sun.

I got off the bike and walked out to the middle of one, marvelling that until 80 years this land had been a dustbowl covered in these flats, until the Government rescued it from the dead, planting salt-friendly mulga trees to bind the soil, then gum, until at least it could be turned into wheat farms so productive that they not only supply all of Australia’s daily bread, but keep Asia topped up with its daily noodle as well.

Down a long road lined with plain trees which could have doubled for an avenue in Provence, we rolled into Norseman, named after the horse whose hoof turned up a nugget and sparked a gold rush, and before long were ensconced in the Railway Hotel, a magnificent art-deco gem which at the height of the gold rush would have charged a week’s wages for a room.

Today, it was owned by a Perth environmental scientist called Therese Wade, who had come out here to study the temperate forests, fallen in love with the building instead, bought it with her brother and was now painstakingly restoring it to its former glory with the help of a heap of optimism and a baffled Alsatian called Audrey.

Even better, it had become a magnet for adventurers, in the past month alone attracting two brothers walking across the country, and a microlight pilot who in attempting to fly the same route had come a cropper while trying to land on the salt flats.

We threw our bags in our rooms and went out to play golf for the afternoon on the world’s longest course: the Nullarbor Links, dreamed up by local businessman Alf Caputo and stretching for 800 miles across the desert, with one hole at each participating town or roadhouse along the way.

“Be careful of your balls, gentlemen,” said Evelyn at the tourist office when we picked up our clubs. “There’s a crow at one of the holes, and a dingo at another, who keep running off with them.”

Colin, being an anarchist by nature, had decided to spurn clubs and use a boomerang with a golf ball gaffer-taped to it; only to regret his decision when his gimcrack device turned out to have a range of about 30 yards, as a result of which I thrashed him at the first hole by a resounding nine  shots to 15.

Still, at least we both beat the hole’s par five by a healthy margin.

  • Welcome

Here you’ll find all the latest news from Geoff and Gary as they recreate the first around the world ride 100 years on, accompanied by Carl Stearns Clancy’s original boots on their second journey around the world 100 years after they did it the first time.
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